Christmas, Foodie thoughts from home, I recommend...., The Lovely Things, Traditions

The Pheasant Philosopher’s Christmas Diaries: Day 11, Kitchen Essentials

Over the past few years, I have accumulated a huge amount of kitchen equipment. Aside from all the pieces brought for styling shoots, there is a core of ten or so items which I couldn’t be without, items which are used every day and make working in the kitchen much more pleasurable. Christmas is always a good time to add a few solid basics to the kitchen cupboards, and although some of these items are quite pricy, you’ll have them years down the line and won’t, for a moment, regret buying them.

Kitchenaid Artisan Mixer

IMG_6666 2

One of the most decadent purchases, but also one of the most used pieces of equipment in my kitchen is the classic time-tested Artisan Mixer.  Perfect for cakes, meringues and bread, the Artisan is solid, and made to last. Mine is now twenty years old and still in tiptop condition. Aside from looking great, they make light work of so many jobs. I chose classic cream but they can be found in many colours – although do consider that if you are going to have it standing in the kitchen for several decades, choosing a neural colour might be preferable.

Le Creuset Casseroles and Saucepans 

I have several Le Creuset casseroles and two sets of their cast iron saucepans. Many of these were vintage finds in French flea markets, however, investing in new Le Creuset is still worthwhile – they do outlast many of of cheaper brands. I use a Le Creuset casserole almost daily, for soups, broths, stews, sauces….even baking bread, creating a ‘Dutch’ oven. The saucepans are extremely durable and all cast iron works on induction which is great for contemporary kitchens.

Global Knife

If there were one single knife to invest in, I would recommend a small Global Santuku – it’s amazingly sharp (so long as you look after it properly) not overly expensive, and can be used for most kitchen tasks. Beautifully weighted, its not intimidating, as some knives are – it’s also aesthetically pleasing.

Le Creuset Rectangular Roaster 

IMG_6668A decent sized cast iron roaster has so many uses, it can be used on the hob for gravy – for lasagne, roasts, Yorkshire puddings, drying herbs, roasted veggies or even making crumbles. It retains heat very well so keeps food warm before serving. Mine is vintage, with folding metal handles, but the new ones are just as good and also come in a variety of colours.

Tala Measure

The Original Cooks Dry Measure sitting on my shelf belonged to my grandmother who bought it in the 1950s – very little has changed in their design since. The new ones do have the advantage of grams as well as ounces but sentimentality prevents me from upgrading. These make baking a cinch, no more dragging out scales and separate bowls, they also measure rice, lentils and peas, are simple to clean and look pleasingly vintage.

Pyrex Measuring Jug

I have several of these, different sizes, the oldest was in our kitchen when I was born, the latest is wide and can be used for mixing, microwaving and baking, as well as measuring. I do try to avoid the dishwashers with these as the writing does become difficult to read after a while (at least on the newer ones). A Pyrex jug goes hand-in-hand with the Tala measure, completing the baking duo.

Cast Iron Griddle: These have been central to Welsh cookery for centuries

Coming from Wales I have been brought up with Welsh Cakes cooked on a Bakestone, and img_7866served hot, scattered with caster sugar. I have three, one contemporary (pictured) and two antique. Of the older two, the first is about  25 cm in diameter, cooks Bara Planc (bread) beautifully and isn’t too heavy…the second is 40 cm in diameter and is brought out for industrial Welsh Cake making, family gatherings etc. This one is extremely heavy, Victorian, and wonderfully pitted on one side by years of use. In Wales, these are heirloom items, hung by the fireplace and used frequently. Welsh Cakes or Pikelets are cooked on the hob now, but once, the griddle sat on top of an open fire or was balanced over the fire on a three-legged stand. I would highly recommend Netherton Foundry’s Shropshire made Griddles, they will certainly stand the test of time and make delightful heirlooms, beautifully handcrafted they are the current by-word in artisan British Kitchen equipment.

Mason Cash Mixing Bowls 

Everybody’s Grandparents had any least one iconic Mason Cash mixing bowl, established in 1901 these classic pieces can still be found in antique fairs and even car boot sales. Today, they are no longer made in the UK, sadly, however they are available in a range of pastel colours and still follow the original design. Mixing the Christmas Pudding in one of these is sure to ignite nostalgic feelings and they look good too.

A Traditionally made Frying Pan (spun steel)

My monster of a frying pan (40 cm in diameter) came from an antiques fair in south-west France, it had been neglected for a fair few years, but some wire wool and several ‘seasons’ later and it’s fabulous, we’ve made Spanish omelettes to serve 10, cooked breakfast for the whole family and even roasted chestnuts. It does take two hands to carry though, but it’s very pleasing to use. Finding exceptional frying pans can prove quite difficult in the UK so, returning to Netherton Foundry, I sincerely recommend their range of Spun Steel Frying Pans. With their wooden handles and vintage rivets, these pans are built to last and get better with each use. No non-stick coating to peel off, just Flax Oil seasoned, these really are a delight to use. Made by hand in Britain they are the legacy of centuries of metalworking tradition in Shropshire and have such integrity – used by all the top chefs, a set of these will be a pleasure for ever.

An End Grain Chopping Board 

IMG_6667 2If you’ve invested in a decent knife, you need to invest in decent chopping board. End grain boards are strong, durable and follow the same pattern as the large butcher’s blocks. I would recommend choosing one at least 8cm deep – a wooden board doesn’t blunt knives as others do. They are naturally hygienic and looks great on the worktop. They can also be used to present food, cheese boards, cold meat platters, bread etc,  so are pretty multi-functional.

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